The public educational system has spent thousands of dollars trying to find out what separates successful students from those who perform badly on their coursework. After hours of extensive research, many concluded that academic performance greatly depended on the student’s study skills. High school students have to contend with familial issues, social pressure, the dating game, learning to drive, and finding a job that they rarely have time to focus on improving their study skills. High school students who fail to study at all may become under-achievers both academically and in other areas of life.

Fortunately, many students can ace their tests without sacrificing their personal time spending hours on learning effective study skills. High school students should start by challenges their attitude towards studying and then work towards incorporating other study skills. Activities for high school academic improvement may include effective time management, self-discipline, organization, memorization, concentration, and overall effort towards mastering study skills.

The high school curriculum tests the student’s ability to read, comprehend, retain, and regurgitate information relevant to the grade level’s progression. High school students with a desire to succeed will accomplish their goals with effective study skills. Activities for high school students seeking to improve their study skills may involve memorization exercises, meditation and relaxation techniques to relieve test anxiety, effective note-taking methods, time management exercises, and listening to audible tapes that test the student’s reading comprehension study skills. High school teachers generally test the student’s ability to retain and comprehend the information using a variety of test formats, such as multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer, and five paragraph essays.

Every student processes information differently; therefore, every student needs to find their own learning style to formulate effective study skills. Activities for high school students in search of mastering their own learning styles may include the Jung typology test, left versus right brain quizzes, IQ tests, and the VARK assessment. Each assessment test evaluates whether a student needs visual, audible, or tactile aides to help improve their study skills. Activities for high school students who need visual aids to learn include tutors who use gestures, presentations, books with diagrams, charts, graphs, and typographical descriptions, such as a highlighting, underlining, and bold text in a notebook or book. High school study skills that incorporate audiotapes of lectures, audio conversions of textbooks, and music presentations of the material will help out the audible learner.

High school study skills that incorporate hands-on projects, laboratories, field trips, and collecting physical objects will help the student who needs kinesthetic stimulation to retain the information. High school study skills that incorporate a variety of these learning styles, also called multimodal, will benefit 60 percent of all students on some level.

Students who fail to listen carefully to the presented material may find it difficult to complete tasks effectively. In order to study effectively, students must listen carefully to what the teacher has to say. Students who fail to listen may also struggle with note taking, or will write down the wrong information. Students who actively listen generally have effective study skills.

Activities for high school freshmen looking to master active listening include asking questions in class, rephrasing what the teacher says, writing it down in a notebook, condensing the information within those notes, and then reading the information until it finally registers. Many high school students struggle with managing their time wisely, which interferes with building effective study skills. Activities for high school sophomores looking to master their time management may include using a calendar, stop watch, calculating needed study time, and placing study time ahead of other “priorities.”

Parents, teachers, and faculty may hear students complain about their inability to concentrate when using their study skills. High school textbooks do not necessarily teach students how to concentrate while studying. Therefore, students may understand how to study, yet lack the ability to focus when it comes time to implement their newly found study skills. High school students generally need a quiet space with a tape recorder that plays “white noise” to mask existing background noise. Students who think a lot can benefit from meditating for 15 minutes to learn how to quiet the mind. Teachers and tutors should emphasize that these concentration exercises will help benefit the curriculum of study skills for high schools everywhere.

Parents who help guide their children to learning the important study skills for high school students will feel proud when they aces the test. In addition, their child will feel confident to implement these fantastic study skills for high school students when it comes time to take standardized tests. Test-takers who use these general study skills for high school students will soon realize their ability to achieve anything in life. Teachers who can instill this sense of confidence in their students should push for effective study skills for high schools everywhere. As a result, school faculties in every district will likely incorporate these study skills for high schools in every jurisdiction. This would help turnaround the academic performance in public schools across the nation.

Follow these links to learn more about Effective Study Skills for High School Students: